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Upgrading your Bugzilla? Don’t forget to Sanity Check first.

When planning on upgrading your Bugzilla to a newer version, it’s always a good idea to read the release notes in case of special instructions that need to be done to handle certain situations in upgrades.  Our checksetup.pl script has gotten pretty good at handling a lot of situations automatically for you these days, but nothing is ever perfect.

One instruction in the upgrade procedure for every release that often gets overlooked is to run the Sanity Check function from the Admin page on your Bugzilla site before upgrading.  It checks the integrity of the data in your database and will alert you to a number of possible problems with your data.  Sometimes bugs in Bugzilla or even people manually messing with the database will cause something to not be how Bugzilla expects it, and every so often one of these problems can cause issues for an upgrade.  Fixing any problems reported by Sanity Check before each upgrade can save you a lot of headaches.

In a recent example: newer versions of Bugzilla allow you to edit the available statuses and resolutions on bugs.  Older versions didn’t.  One of the steps performed by the upgrade script is to examine your database, take whatever current statuses you’ve been using (even if you hacked your Bugzilla to allow different ones before we actually let you customize them), and convert them to the way the new customizable ones are stored.  The new custom status system has a flag to distinguish between statuses that are allowed to have resolutions and those that aren’t.  When upgrading, it decides whether to set that flag on a status or not by looking in your database to see if there are any bugs with that status that have resolutions on them.  If it finds any, the status is set up to use them.

A long time ago there was Bug 107229 which caused duplicate bugs to get the wrong status if you midaired while marking it a duplicate.  This caused bugs to exist in an “ASSIGNED DUPLICATE” state that should have been “RESOLVED DUPLICATE”.  A side effect is if it was left that way, when you later upgraded to a version of Bugzilla that included the custom statuses, your ASSIGNED status became a “closed” type instead of an “open” one, and would require a resolution.  Sanity Check most likely would have caught this, as it checks for things like resolutions where there shouldn’t be any. :)

Release of Bugzilla 4.4rc1, 4.2.4, 4.0.9, and 3.6.12

Today we have several new releases for you!

All of today’s releases contain security fixes. We recommend that all Bugzilla administrators read the Security Advisory that was published along with these releases.

Bugzilla 4.4rc1 is our first Release Candidate for Bugzilla 4.4. This release has received QA testing, and should be considerably more stable than the development releases before it. It is still not considered fully stable, and so you should understand that if you use it, you use it at your own risk.

If feedback from this release candidate indicates that it is mostly stable, then Bugzilla 4.4 will be released in a few weeks. If feedback indicates that more extensive fixes are needed, there may be another release candidate after this one.

Bugzilla 4.2.4 is our latest stable release. It contains various useful bug fixes and security improvements:

Bugzilla 4.0.9 is a security update for the 4.0 branch:

Bugzilla 3.6.12 is a security update for the 3.6 branch:

Release of Bugzilla 4.3.3, 4.2.3, 4.0.8, and 3.6.11

Today we have several new releases for you!

All of today’s releases contain security fixes. We recommend that all Bugzilla administrators read the Security Advisory that was published along with these releases.

Bugzilla 4.2.3 is our latest stable release. It contains various useful bug fixes and security improvements:

Bugzilla 4.0.8 is a security update for the 4.0 branch:

Bugzilla 3.6.11 is a security update for the 3.6 branch:

Bugzilla 4.3.3 is an unstable development release. This release has not received QA testing from the Bugzilla Project, and should not be used in production environments. Development releases exist as previews of the features that the next major release of Bugzilla will contain. They also exist for testing purposes, to collect bug reports and feedback, so if you find a bug in this development release (or you don’t like how some feature works) please tell us.

Release of Bugzilla 4.3.2, 4.2.2, 4.0.7, and 3.6.10

Today we have several new releases for you!

All of today’s releases contain security fixes. We recommend that all Bugzilla administrators read the Security Advisory that was published along with these releases.

Bugzilla 4.2.2 is our latest stable release. It contains various useful bug fixes and security improvements:

Bugzilla 4.0.7 is a security update for the 4.0 branch:

Bugzilla 3.6.10 is a security update for the 3.6 branch:

Bugzilla 4.3.2 is an unstable development release. This release has not received QA testing from the Bugzilla Project, and should not be used in production
environments. Development releases exist as previews of the features that the next major release of Bugzilla will contain. They also exist for testing purposes, to collect bug reports and feedback, so if you find
a bug in this development release (or you don’t like how some feature works) please tell us.

Release of Bugzilla 4.2rc2, 4.0.4, 3.6.8, and 3.4.14

Today we are announcing the second Release Candidate for Bugzilla 4.2, in addition to one new stable release and two security-only updates for the 3.4.x and 3.6.x series.

Bugzilla 4.2rc2 is our second Release Candidate for Bugzilla 4.2. This release has received QA testing, and should be considerably more stable than the development releases before it. It is still not considered fully stable, and so you should understand that if you use it, you use it at your own risk. This will most likely be the last release candidate before 4.2 final.

Bugzilla 4.0.4 is our latest stable release. It contains various useful bug fixes and security improvements for the 4.0 branch.

Bugzilla 3.6.8 and 3.4.14 are security updates for the 3.6 branch and the 3.4 branch, respectively.

All the gory details and download links and the security advisory are available on our website.

Get Involved

As always, we love new contributors in every area. There are a lot of ways to contribute to Bugzilla–you don’t just have to be a programmer. In particular, we’d really love to have somebody to be in charge of our documentation. If you know anybody who’s a great documenter (including yourself!) who wants to help out an open-source project, please send them our way!

Release of Bugzilla 4.1.2, 4.0.1, 3.6.5, and 3.4.11

Hey Bugzilla users! We just released four new versions of Bugzilla. There were a lot of cool bug fixes in 3.6.5 and 4.0.1, but most importantly, if you had trouble installing Bugzilla 4.0, you should try again now with Bugzilla 4.0.1. There was a problem with the way that our install-module.pl script installed the Math::Random::Secure module–basically, it would install the module even though the module’s prerequisites failed to install. Then when you tried to run checksetup.pl, Math::Random::Secure would throw a cryptic error about “Math::Random::Secure::irand.”

Now, in 4.0.1 and 3.6.5, install-module.pl won’t install the module if installing it would break your system. Basically, following the standard installation instructions should work fine, now. Bugzilla 3.4.11 took this a step further and no longer uses Math::Random::Secure at all for this older branch (although don’t worry, Bugzilla 3.4.x is still secure).

For 4.1.2, we made this protection even more extreme–install-module.pl now completely refuses to operate if you don’t have a compiler installed somewhere on your system (because so many CPAN modules require a compiler, and CPAN throws very confusing error messages when there is no compiler available on your system).

New Features in 4.1.2

All right, with all that out of the way, let’s talk about new features in 4.1.2! Here’s a quick list of important new things:

  • Extensions can call a web_dir method to get the on-disk path to where web-accessible files should go for the extensions.
  • Work to improve Bugzilla’s accessibility (per the WAI WCAG) is ongoing.
  • There’s a new hook in Bugzilla::Install::Filesystem to allow extensions to create their own files, directories, etc.
  • Searching by relative dates (like 1d, 1w, etc.) now don’t round you off to the beginning of the time period (that is, the beginning of the day, the start of the week) unless you put the letter “s” after them (exception: searching for “0d” or “0w” still gives you the start of that the current day, week, etc.).
  • New WebService function: Product.create
  • New WebService function: Group.create
  • If you change the requestee of a flag that is set to “?”, the “requester” will not change.
  • install-module.pl now requires a compiler to be installed on the system.
  • Update to YUI 2.9.0.
  • contrib/bugzilla_ldapsync.rb has been removed (it was non-functional).
  • If you are using some authentication method that uses the extern_id field (like LDAP), you can now edit a user’s extern_id from the Users control panel.

The Plan For Pretty

So, as you may have read, the “Make Bugzilla Pretty” contest is over, and Jonathan Wilde has won. The current plan is for his UI to be the new official UI for Bugzilla 5.0, which will come some time after 4.2.

Basically, the way that it will work is this: After we branch for 4.2, we will create a new “pretty” branch. The Bugzilla team will work on implementing the new UI in this branch, while simultaneously doing new feature development on the normal Bugzilla trunk. Once the “pretty” branch is ready, it will be merged back into the trunk. We can do this all fairly efficiently thanks to bzr.

Now, there is a chance that the “pretty” branch won’t be ready by the time we want to do the release that follows 4.2. In this case, that release will be called 4.4 and the release after that will have the new UI. However, we very much want to release the new UI as soon as possible, so our goal is for 5.0 to be the release after 4.2.

Get Involved

As always, we love new contributors in every area. There are a lot of ways to contribute to Bugzilla–you don’t just have to be a programmer. In particular, we’d really love to have somebody to be in charge of our documentation. If you know anybody who’s a great documenter (including yourself!) who wants to help out an open-source project, please send them our way!

-Max

Winner of the “Make Bugzilla Pretty” Contest

All the votes are in for the “Make Bugzilla Pretty” contest, and we have a winner!

First off, let me say that every single entry was amazing. Every single person who entered had innovative ideas, and nearly every entry was prettier than our current UI.

There were four candidates who were mentioned in some positive way by almost every voter:

Any of these designers would be a worthwhile addition to any UX team anywhere. Simply the ability to take Bugzilla’s existing UI and turn it into something that nearly everybody finds attractive is an accomplishment that few designers could achieve. In the 13 years of Bugzilla’s history, I’ve never seen it done before these entries. I would be personally happy to write a recommendation for any of the above designers, and they may contact me for that if they wish.

Let’s just say a few words about each of these designs:

Alex Faaborg

There were a ton of positive comments on the usability aspects and organization of Alex Faaborg’s [Bracket] theme, particularly some of the new fields suggested and the brilliant use of color to improve the scanability of the page. It was impressive that everything on the page is basically text or lines, and yet it creates a very readable, clean, simple layout.

We expect future versions of Bugzilla to draw a lot on the usability concepts present in Faaborg’s design, even though it is not the first-place winner.

Zeeshan Syed

There were a lot of positive comments on the use of space in Zeeshan Syed’s design. The color contrast really makes things readable, the tab navigation is very clear, and the section titles really stand out.

Long Duong

Voters were almost overwhelmingly positive about Long Duong’s design. Many people mentioned that they liked the clean lines and very “Bugzilla” feel of the bug page, and that the collapsible sections were a great touch while still being visually appealing. There was also a lot of positive feedback about the header design–people really loved its organization and style. Finally, the home page design was just really cool.

Based on the number of votes and the general amount of positive feedback, Duong is our first runner-up for the Make Bugzilla Pretty contest, and it is very likely that we will end up incorporating some of his UI concepts into our final design.

Jonathan Wilde

This was a stiff competition, and all of the above designs would have worked great as our new UI. However, the winner of the “Make Bugzilla Pretty” contest, and indeed the recipient of the majority of votes, is Jonathan Wilde:

Jonathan’s ability to convert our UI into something beautiful and simple that even new users will find approachable is beyond anything that we had ever imagined could be done with Bugzilla. We are thrilled that Jonathan has won, and excited to implement his design as the official UI of Bugzilla 5.0.

Thanks to Everybody

We would like to thank everybody who entered. Your entries made this contest a fascinating and transformative experience for the Bugzilla Project. We were consistently amazed at the creativity, intelligence, and design sense that so many of you displayed, and wish you great fortune in the future of your careers.

-Max


Upcoming Events

  • Bugzilla Public Meeting July 22, 2015 at 7:00 am – 8:00 am Mozilla Vidyo, Air Mozilla, IRC Public Bugzilla planning meeting. Anyone interested in contrib uting to Bugzilla, in planning, development, testing, documentation, o r any other aspect, should feel free to attend. See https://wiki.mozill a.org/Bugzilla:Meetings for more.
  • Bugzilla Public Meeting August 26, 2015 at 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm Mozilla Vidyo, Air Mozilla, IRC Public Bugzilla planning meeting. Anyone interested in contrib uting to Bugzilla, in planning, development, testing, documentation, o r any other aspect, should feel free to attend. See https://wiki.mozill a.org/Bugzilla:Meetings for more.

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